England locks back down, Italy puts regions on red alert as Covid-19 deaths spike 43% in Europe – CNN

  1. England locks back down, Italy puts regions on red alert as Covid-19 deaths spike 43% in Europe  CNN
  2. New Mexico reports 14 new deaths, 1,022 additional COVID-19 cases  KOB
  3. ‘It is everywhere’: As COVID-19 cases surge, Allegheny County health official urges precautions  Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
  4. Latest on COVID-19 in MN: Record cases; hospital beds filling; 31 deaths  Minnesota Public Radio News
  5. The Latest: Cyprus bringing back overnight curfew  Miami Herald
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News



Source: Google News, England locks back down, Italy puts regions on red alert as Covid-19 deaths spike 43% in Europe – CNN

Twitter flags posts by Trump that made premature claims of victory or baseless ones about election fraud. – The New York Times

  1. Twitter flags posts by Trump that made premature claims of victory or baseless ones about election fraud.  The New York Times
  2. ‘We hereby claim’: Twitter users claim things they don’t own to mock Trump’s election demands  USA TODAY
  3. Twitter flags Trump tweets complaining of ‘ballot dumps’  Fox News
  4. Presidential election results 2020: Live updates  CNN
  5. Democrats renew calls for Twitter to suspend Trump for spreading misinformation  POLITICO
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News



Source: Google News, Twitter flags posts by Trump that made premature claims of victory or baseless ones about election fraud. – The New York Times

Dow Jones Futures: Election Results Drive Decisive Stock Market Rally; Google, JD.com Lead 8 New Breakouts – Investor's Business Daily

  1. Dow Jones Futures: Election Results Drive Decisive Stock Market Rally; Google, JD.com Lead 8 New Breakouts  Investor’s Business Daily
  2. Nasdaq, S&P 500 post-election gains best ever despite chaos  Fox Business
  3. S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite rally above 50-day moving average early Wednesday as 2020 presidential race remains tight  MarketWatch
  4. Stocks rise in post-election rally even as winner remains unclear, S&P 500 jumps 2%  CNBC
  5. Here Are The Stocks That Are Surging–And Tanking–As Blue Wave Hopes Fade  Forbes
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News



Source: Google News, Dow Jones Futures: Election Results Drive Decisive Stock Market Rally; Google, JD.com Lead 8 New Breakouts – Investor’s Business Daily

Newt Gingrich urges Trump to file lawsuits 'in every single state'

Newt Gingrich on ABC’s “The View” (video screenshot)

Former Republican House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who engineered the GOP takeover of the House in 1994, on Wednesday urged President Trump to turn the battle over the 2020 presidential race into a war, filing a lawsuit “in every single state” if necessary.

And the president shouldn’t assume that the results being reported, such as in Arizona, are “legitimate,” he said.

The Trump campaign claims that with the president on a path to victory Tuesday night, vote counting stopped and overnight huge “surges” of ballots were counted for Joe Biden, sometimes coming without even a single accompanying vote for the president.

The Trump campaign said it was launching several legal challenges.

But Gingrich said in an interview reported by DailyMail.com that along with the legal fight, Senate Republicans should open up investigations into what happened in the election.

“I advise him first of all to ask Sen. McConnell [and] Sen. Graham to have the Judiciary Committee in the Senate open up investigation on all of these different states,” he said, referencing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.

“Philadelphia is notorious for [being] a place that steals votes. All those things ought to be looked at, first of all by the law enforcement side. Because those things are crimes,” he said.

wnd-donation-graphic-2-2019

The post Newt Gingrich urges Trump to file lawsuits ‘in every single state’ appeared first on WND.



Source: WND Politics, Newt Gingrich urges Trump to file lawsuits ‘in every single state’

More women and more Black women than ever ran for Congress in 2020, but they still lost ground

More women and more Black women than ever ran for Congress in 2020, but they still lost groundIn 2020, Black women set a new record – 117 entered primaries for the House and 13 for the U.S. Senate, according to the Center for American Women and Politics.In total, 643 women were candidates in congressional primary and general elections, including a record number of Asian or Pacific Islander, Latina, Middle Eastern or North African and Native American women. Still, women ended up losing eight seats in Congress. In 2018, the nation elected 127 women – and 48 women of color – to the House and Senate. This year, that dropped to 117 women and 45 women of color.Throughout my career as a political science professor, I’ve studied women’s representation in mayoral, congressional, gubernatorial and presidential elections. Here’s my look at the female demographics of Congress following the 2020 elections. Freshmen no moreMany of the women first elected to Congress in 2018 retained their seats.All four members of “the Squad” were reelected. These women – Ayanna Pressley, Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib – are Democratic women of color known for their progressive policies, including the Green New Deal.Also reelected were Illinois Democrat Lauren Underwood, winner of a predominantly white and Republican district in 2018; Jahana Hayes, the first Black woman to represent Connecticut; and Georgia’s Lucy McBath, winner in a district that had been held by Republicans for almost four decades. These reelections prove that their victories in 2018’s “pink wave” weren’t a fluke and that they have real staying power in Congress. In some of the 2020 congressional races, Black women ran against each other – a sign of their strong participation. For example, Florida’s Val Demings, Florida’s Frederica Wilson and Georgia’s Nikema Williams – who will succeed the late civil rights icon John Lewis – won their congressional races after defeating other Black females. Notable newcomersSome women will be joining Congress for the first time in January.Cori Bush, a Black Lives Matter activist, became Missouri’s first Black female congresswoman and represents a district that includes the cities of St. Louis and Ferguson, the site of the police killing of African American teenager Michael Brown in 2014. Ferguson also elected its first Black female mayor this year.Bush defeated African American Congressman William Lacy Clay Jr.. Clay, Jr. and his father represented the district for over 50 years. Other women of color joining Congress for the first time include Telemundo journalist Maria Elvira Salazar, a Republican who unseated Donna Shalala in Florida, and attorney Teresa Fernandez, a Democrat from New Mexico. Some underdogs didn’t make itSo who lost?Arkansas’s Joyce Elliott, a teacher and veteran state legislator, came up short in her bid to become the first African American congressional member from Arkansas.Florida’s Pam Keith, a military veteran and attorney, lost by a wide margin to her Republican opponent. Patricia Timmons-Goodson, the first African American member of the North Carolina Supreme Court whose federal judicial nomination by Barack Obama was blocked by Republicans, failed to win a seat in Congress. Also coming up short was Tennessee’s Marquita Bradshaw, a single mother and environmental activist who would have been Tennessee’s first Black female congressional member if she had won. California’s Tamika Hamilton, Georgia’s Vivian Childs, Maryland’s Kimberly Klacik and Ohio’s Lavern Gore are all Republicans who ran in mostly urban Democratic districts, but none won on election night. All Black female congresswomen – with the exception of Utah’s Mia Love, who served one term in the House – have been Democrats, suggesting that the path to victory is especially steep for Black Republican women. A white man’s government?For most of its history, the members of both Houses of Congress have been white men. The monotony began to break in 1917 when Montana’s Jeannette Rankin became the first female congresswoman. In 1964, Hawaii’s Patsy Mink became the first Asian American congresswoman. The first Latina, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida, was elected in 1989. In 1968, the late Shirley Chisholm became the first Black woman to serve in Congress. Four years later, two more Black women arrived in Congress, Barbara Jordan of Texas and Yvonne Braithwaite-Burke of California. Chisholm called Black women “catalysts for change” in politics. U.S. Rep Maxine Waters, a Democrat from California, once tweeted, “I cannot be intimidated and I’m not going anywhere.” [Deep knowledge, daily. Sign up for The Conversation’s newsletter.]Kimberlé Crenshaw’s theory of intersectionality suggests Black women are disadvantaged because of the “intersection” of their racial, gender and class identities. One result is that they encounter disadvantages when running for office. Some of these women were disadvantaged by their race, gender or class when running against well-funded incumbents. Yet, my work in the field of women and politics also suggests that the long tradition of Black female political leadership in America is gaining momentum.This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts. It was written by: Sharon Austin, University of Florida.Read more: * Did prehistoric women hunt? New research suggests so * Why there’s so much legal uncertainty about resolving a disputed presidential electionSharon Austin does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.



Source: Yahoo News, More women and more Black women than ever ran for Congress in 2020, but they still lost ground

Check the Tape: What to expect from Tom Brady in Antonio Brown’s Buccaneers debut – Yahoo Sports

  1. Check the Tape: What to expect from Tom Brady in Antonio Brown’s Buccaneers debut  Yahoo Sports
  2. New Orleans Saints’ Drew Brees, Alvin Kamara shrug off injury-report status  ESPN
  3. Antonio Brown opens up about his second chance with Buccaneers, relationship with Tom Brady  CBS Sports
  4. Drew Brees on Buccaneers’ Defensive Unit, Saints Offensive Execution | Saints-Buccaneers Week 9 2020  New Orleans Saints
  5. Saints begin to inch higher in Week 9 Power Rankings  Canal Street Chronicles
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News



Source: Google News, Check the Tape: What to expect from Tom Brady in Antonio Brown’s Buccaneers debut – Yahoo Sports

US elections have become a drama frustratingly divorced from democracy

Americans’ assumptions about elections in the United States do not match the current or historical reality. With few exceptions, American elections have been messy, time-consuming, contested and sometimes violent. The frustrating uncertainty about the 2020 contest between Joe Biden and President Donald Trump is startling only because we do not know our own history, and refuse to recognize the inherited weaknesses in our democratic system which we must, at last, reform.



Source: CNN, US elections have become a drama frustratingly divorced from democracy

Who is Jellyfish on 'The Masked Singer'? Clues point to this top athlete – Entertainment Weekly

  1. Who is Jellyfish on ‘The Masked Singer’? Clues point to this top athlete  Entertainment Weekly
  2. Teaser: These Masked Celebrities Can Dance | Season 1 | THE MASKED DANCER  The Masked Singer
  3. The Masked Singer Recaps Season 4 Highlights; Mask Clues Updated  Bleeding Cool News
  4. Who is Broccoli on The Masked Singer? Here’s our best guess  Entertainment Weekly
  5. Preview: Get Ready For Another Knockout Performance | Tonight at 8/7c | THE MASKED SINGER  The Masked Singer
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News



Source: Google News, Who is Jellyfish on ‘The Masked Singer’? Clues point to this top athlete – Entertainment Weekly

Oregon Becomes First State To Decriminalize Cocaine, Heroin, & Meth; Legalizes Shrooms

Oregon Becomes First State To Decriminalize Cocaine, Heroin, & Meth; Legalizes Shrooms

Tyler Durden

Wed, 11/04/2020 – 19:00

While the results of the Presidential race drag on, one ballot initiative on election day has been made crystal clear: Oregon has become the first state to decriminalize small amounts of hard drugs, including cocaine, heroin and meth. 

The “Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act” seeks to decriminalize drug usage and instead focus on a health care approach. The bill reads:

“People suffering from addiction are more effectively treated with health care services than with criminal punishments. A health care approach includes a health assessment to figure out the needs of people who are suffering from addiction, and it includes connecting them to the services they need.”

The ballot measure passed 59% to 41% on election day, according to Fox News

Those who are caught with hard drugs would now have the option of paying a $100 fine or attending new addiction recovery centers, paid for with taxes from retail marijuana sales.

“It’s going to be huge,” Haven Wheelock, a drug counselor for Portland nonprofit Outside In, told VICE.

 “It’s going to allow people to get the services they need without fear of arrest. It’s going to change how people who don’t use drugs think about drug use. It’s going to allow us to move into a health-based system and hopefully be a model for other places. We have an opportunity to show the rest of the country this is how it should be.”

Under the new measure, possession of less than 1 gram of heroin or meth, 2 grams of cocaine, 12 grams of psilocybin, 40 doses of LSD, oxycodone or methadone and 1 gram of MDMA is decriminalized. 

Countries like Portugal, the Netherlands and Switzerland have already implemented similar measures. In Portugal, the change saw “no surge” in new drug use. In fact, drug deaths fell while the number of people in the country treated for addiction rose 20% between 2001 and 2008. Then, the number stabilized. 

The U.N. Chief Executives Board for Coordination announced in 2019 that it would also “promote alternatives to conviction and punishment in appropriate cases, including the decriminalization of drug possession for personal use” in order to “address prison overcrowding and overincarceration by people accused of drug crimes.”

The new proposed measure in Oregon had the backing of “the Oregon Nurses Association, the Oregon chapter of the American College of Physicians and the Oregon Academy of Family Physicians,” according to ABC.

The groups contend that: “Punishing people for drug use and addiction is costly and hasn’t worked. More drug treatment, not punishment, is a better approach.” 

Arguing against the initiative were 24 district attorneys, who claimed the measure “recklessly decriminalizes possession of the most dangerous types of drugs (and) will lead to an increase in acceptability of dangerous drugs.”

Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt argued last week in support of the bill, saying: “Misguided drug laws have created deep disparities in the justice system. Arresting people with addictions is a cruel punishment because it slaps them with a lifelong criminal record that can ruin lives.”

Jimmy Jones, executive director of Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action, a group that helps the homeless, concluded:

 “Every time that this happens, not only does that individual enter the criminal justice system but it makes it very difficult for us, on the back end, to house any of these folks because a lot of landlords won’t touch people with recent criminal history.”

Additionally, voters also made history by legalizing psilocybin or “magic” mushrooms by approving Measure 109 – the Psilocybin Mushroom Services Program Initiative – by 55.88 percent.

Under the measure, the state will become the first in the country legalize the use of the psychedelic fungus in controlled doses within the framework of a regulated system overseen by licensed clinicians and therapists.



Source: Zero Hedge, Oregon Becomes First State To Decriminalize Cocaine, Heroin, & Meth; Legalizes Shrooms